Although there is widespread support for ensuring that more women become leaders, therefore reversing their under-representation in the echelons of power, too many offered remedies are founded on the incorrect assumption that women should imitate men. The argument goes, “If men have the majority of high-ranking posts, they must be doing something right or something that can’t be questioned.” The narrative continues as, “Why not get females to act like them?” 

We should urge men in authority to embrace some of the more productive leadership lessons men can learn from women, rather than pushing women to act like male leaders (many of whom are inept). As a result, there would be a bigger pool of excellent role models to choose from, opening the way for both men and women to progress.

The statistics of women in power

Women hold just 24% of senior leadership positions globally. In comparison to China, where women hold 51 percent of senior leadership positions, the United States lags under the worldwide average of 21%. Women make up 45 percent of the S&P 500 workforce, but just 4% of CEOs. According to the research of almost 22,000 publicly listed companies throughout the world, 60% of them have no female board members.

Also, read Significance of women leadership

Leadership lessons men can learn from women

1.When you have nothing to lean on, don’t lean in

Women are being encouraged to “lean in” to traits such as assertiveness, boldness, and confidence. Self-promotion, taking credit for others’ accomplishments, and aggressive behavior are examples of male leadership traits. 

In a rational society, we would promote individuals to leadership positions when they are competent rather than confident, screening them for their knowledge, track record, and appropriate leadership skills. 

Also, read 9 things successful men never do

2.Be aware of your own limitations

We live in a world that values self-confidence, but self-awareness is far more essential. Despite the fact that women are not as insecure as they are depicted in self-help literature (and most of the popular media), studies reveal that they are less overconfident than males. 

This is excellent news because it allows them to view themselves through the eyes of others and allows them to identify gaps between where they want to be and where they are now. People who have a more critical view of themselves than others are more prepared, even if it means overpreparing, which is a good strategy to improve your competence and performance.

Read How to manage your anxiety.

3. Motivate people by transforming them

Women are more likely than men to lead through inspiration, changing people’s attitudes and beliefs, and aligning people with meaning and purpose (rather than through carrots and sticks), according to academic studies, this is also one of the most visible effects of gender on leadership. 

Men would be better leaders if they spent more time trying to win people’s hearts and souls, leading with both EQ and IQ rather than just the latter, and nurturing a change in beliefs rather than behaviors.

Also, read The recipe for being successful.

4. Put your people first 

Men are more self-centered than women, and they are more inclined to lead in a narcissistic and selfish manner. If the average male leader wishes to improve his or her performance, he or she should change their leadership style to be less self-centered. Putting people first is one of the most important leadership skills that men can learn from women. 

5. Empathize rather than command

So long as we have humans at work, they will seek the recognition, admiration, and empathy that only humans, not robots, can offer. By studying and copying women, males may learn a lot about how to do this effectively. Empathy is one trait that women leaders exhibit more. It shows how gender plays a significant role in defining leadership.

Speaking of robots and AI, read Alexa and commands to fix in case of any problems.

 6. Focus on others’ advancement 

The ‘masculine and ‘feminine’ are two very different energies. And when it comes to the effects of gender on leadership, female leaders have been shown to be more likely than male leaders to train, mentor, and develop their direct subordinates. They are real talent agents, providing criticism and guidance to help others develop. 

This entails treating employees less transactionally and more strategically, as well as being willing to recruit individuals who are better than them because their egos are less likely to get in the way. 

While we admire self-centered and self-centered leaders, the chances of such persons turning a bunch of people into a high-performing team are slim. Since females have a more empathetic side to them, this attribute adds to the effects of gender on leadership. 

7. Don’t claim to be “humbled.” Be modest

In humility, there are well-established gender disparities that benefit women. Of course, not all women are modest, but if leaders were chosen solely on humility, there would be more female leaders than male leaders. 

Humility is mostly a female characteristic. It’s also one of the most important aspects of becoming a successful leader. Without humility, it will be difficult for anybody in a position of authority to admit their faults, learn from their mistakes, consider the viewpoints of others, and be ready to change and improve.

Perhaps the problem isn’t that men are reluctant or unable to show it, but that when they do, we reject them from leadership positions. This must change because humility is a key factor in both men’s and women’s leadership success.

The concept that expanding female participation in leadership will increase rather than decrease meritocracy is, at the end of the day, the sole contentious component of our positions. 

The most effective gender equality intervention is to focus on equalizing talent and potential, which can only happen when we have gender-equal leadership, which allows you to learn leadership lessons men can learn. These teachings are some pointers of leadership lessons that men can learn from women.

Stay Handsome fellas and keep working hard!